SNIPPETS FROM HYGGE

  • All about liquorice...

    All about liquorice...

    All of Scandinavia and in particular Denmark, have a particular love affair with everything liquorice. You’ll find it in many different products here, including liquorice beer, ice-cream, chocolate, fudge, mints and of course candy. The Danes can also chew their way through tons of salty liquorice which is something of a speciality here, and not known many other places. Liquorice root is one of the most popular herbs in the world. Its botanical name comes for the Greek words meaning “sweet root”. The liquorice plant is a perennial herb and a member of the pea family, native to southern Europe,...

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  • Image  - Aalborg Aquavit

    Make your own Easter Aquavit...

    Ah, Easter lunch. Now that’s a Danish tradition that you don’t want to miss – trust me, the food is excellent and, like Christmas, incorporates lots of our favourite smorrebrod as well as the traditional Danish Snaps or Aquavit.For the vast majority of Danes, Easter is a family holiday, and most people are off work. We cook at home, spend time with loved ones, eat, drink and have lots of hygge.And though Danish aquavit comes in many different sizes and flavours, there is something much more enjoyable and fun about making your own.And what would be more perfect for an...

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  • Danish Easter - The 'Gækkebrev'

    Danish Easter - The 'Gækkebrev'

    The Danish Easter tradition with foolish guessing letters - gækkebreve - is still kept all over Denmark during Easter, for children as well as adults. You send beautiful homemade foolish guessing letters, with no sender name, and test your friends and family members: can they guess your name from the poem in the letter? If not, you will get an Easter egg... Why? Where does the tradition come from?  The 'gækkebrev' tradition is originally a German tradition with so called 'knot letters'. They were send in Denmark from 1600 and to 1800. The tradition was that the receiver of the letter should...

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  • Going green...

    Going green...

    The marzipan-covered-rum-chocolate-cakes are called ‘Træstammer’ which translated means Tree Logs – speaking to the signature green coloured marzipan and the brown chocolate ends.Danish ‘Træstamme’ is traditionally made from left-over cake which is blended together with marzipan, dark chocolate, raspberry jam and a little rum essence. They are then covered with marzipan and the ends dipped in chocolate. It's a very old school little cake, which can be found in even the smallest bakeries across Denmark.You can easily use different types of cake or pastries for the truffle mix, for instance danish pastry, chocolate cake, sponge. So when ever you have...

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  • Homemade, easy sourdough...

    Homemade, easy sourdough...

    Sourdough is an important and tasty ingredient when making chewy and dense bread with a crisp crust like the Danish, popular Rye Bread. Making the first portion of sourdough is very easy and it only requires few and simple ingredient – Regular flour– Rye flour– Water The only downside is that it takes about 5 days to ‘start’ the first portion of a sourdough. Once it is ‘up and running’ it is easily maintained by ‘feeding’ the dough every once in a while. A sourdough is only made from flour and water – no yeast is added. Instead a sourdough...

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  • Time for Danish sweet buns...

    Time for Danish sweet buns...

    Fastelavn is a Danish holiday normally celebrated on Sunday or Monday before Ash Wednesday. It is somewhat similar to the American Halloween where children dress in costumes and go from house to house calling for candy or they will play tricks (though tricks are normally played no matter what, such as toothpaste or shaving cream on door handles or toilet paper on cars).Some towns may have a parade followed by the traditional ‘slå katten af tynden’ which is a wooden barrel that has cats painted on it and is filled with candy. The children takes turn hitting the barrel with...

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